Tuesday, December 4, 2012

Ebooks and Print Books Can Coexist (Infographic)

I've been quite interested in the rise of e-books, from both a reader's and a writer's perspective (check out my comic on the battle of ebooks v. readers). Teachingdegree.org has published a fascinating update of how people currently use e-books and print books. Most of the information is not surprising to me (people with e-readers read more books and also read printed books), but it was interesting to learn that reading e-books is slower than print books.



Scroll down below for a brief interview with Allison Morris, who helped develop this infographic.

E-books Infographic

Mini Interview with Allison Morris


Q. Tell me about yourself.

I work with a small team of designers, and we build and design graphics for internet resource sites, including TeachingDegree.org. Our primary goal with these pieces is to be able to make a connection between visualization and learning. In other words, our hope is that we'll be able to create useful and interesting resources for our readers.

Q. How did this graphic come about?

The idea for the graphic stemmed from a New York Time article I came across which discussed some pretty interesting trends on print books and ebooks. From there, we thought it could translate really well as a visual piece, and we were able to find some pretty surprising stats to support the overall piece.

Q. What was the most surprising finding for you?

Finding out about the difference in reading speeds between electronic books and print books was a pretty interesting find on my part. It makes me wonder why that might be the case.

Q. As e-readers continue to rise in popularity, do you think books and e-readers will continue to coexist, or will e-readers edge out books?

I think as the coming generations familiarize themselves with digital gadgets and as people begin to consider the benefits, ebooks will definitely have an edge in the future. However, I don't think this trend is as fast as a lot of people might assume. Overall, I think it'll take awhile before digitizing our books in the classroom, libraries, etc. will be considered the norm. So, while it'll happen one day, I don't think print books will be going away anytime soon.


If you liked this post, you may also enjoy:




2 comments:

  1. Love this article! I must share. Having graphics like this is very helpful, especially when talking about statistics. Thank you Sylvia and Allison.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Interesting stats. My local library now has e-book options, but I haven't tried them out yet.

    ReplyDelete

Join the discussion...