Monday, April 22, 2013

Five Books that Will Take Your Writing to the Next Level

How do you become a better writer? You can write a lot. You can read a lot. And you can read how-to-write books. While my main focus is illustration, I have taken creative writing classes and studied many craft books. Here are the most useful and practical ones I've come across:


Picture Books



Writing Picture Books: A Hands-On Guide From Story Creation to Publication, by Ann Whitford Paul (Writer's Digest Books, 2009) Of the many how to books on picture books, I've found this to be the most useful and practical. Ms. Paul walks the reader through the development of a picture book, from the initial decisions (the story's central question, point of view, compelling main character, conflict) to the nitty gritty of drafting (beginnings, acts, themes, show don't tell, endings). She includes additional great advice on revising and marketing one's work.


Friday, April 12, 2013

Norfolk Academy Art Show 2013

© 2013 Sylvia Liu
© 2013 Sylvia Liu
© 2013 Sylvia Liu

UPDATE 5/15/13: I sold all four pieces that I submitted to this show. If you are interested in an original painting similar to these, please contact me.

I just submitted four paintings to the annual Norfolk Academy Art Show.

This is a fun exhibit that attracts over 100 local and area artists. The show can be overwhelming because the visual stimuli of so many different styles from so many artists can be overwhelming. But it's a great way to see the breadth and variety of the local art scene.

The opening reception is Saturday, April 27, from 6-8 p.m. at the John H. Tucker, Jr. Arts Center, 1585 Wesleyan Ave., Norfolk, VA 23502. The show will remain up for about two weeks.


Monday, April 8, 2013

Ionesco's Stories: Theater of the Absurd for Children


Stories 1.2.3.4, by Eugène Ionesco, illustrated by Etienne Delessert (McSweeney's McMullens, 2012). Originally published in the early 1970s, this reissued compilation of four picture book stories by the famous playwright Ionesco is an excellent example of his absurdist views made accessible to children.